A Book Marketing Guide – Are You Using Hashtags on Twitter?

November 12, 2014 in Articles, Book Marketing, Book promotions

Twitter & HashtagsI am pretty sure that most people involved in any online marketing, whether that is for books or any other product, will have heard of or even use Twitter. But many will perhaps not be so familiar with the practice of using hashtags on Twitter to ensure their tweets can be found by the people interested in the topic they are tweeting about.

To sum it up, putting a hashtag (#) before a word in a twitter status is a way of identifying the topic being tweeted about. What this means is that when another user searches on Twitter for that subject, they are likely to use the ‘hashtag‘ search term to really home in on the topics of interest.

Just for clarity I should point out that using the # (hashtag) is not an official Twitter function, it was started, allegedly, by a Twitter user who thought that it was a good idea to add some sort of identifier to a keyword (a term people search for) to make it easier to find. And it just took off. So now anyone can create a hashtag and they can try and make it into a Twitter standard. For example if I added #ebookissues to every tweet I posted, people would be able to use that hashtag term to identify any discussions about this website or the tweets posted about this website. The aim of course is make the term go viral and to see it trending on Twitter, in other words to have thousands of people talking about and discussing the topic.

Why would you want to be using hashtags on Twitter As a Writer?

Why is this useful for writers and authors that use Twitter? The answer is twofold:

  • Firstly you can create a hashtag for you as an author, or your book title or your book series. Effectively creating a brand and a way for your readers to find your book related tweets easily. There is work involved in this option and you will need to persevere, but it is certainly possible
  • Secondly you can use established hashtag terms to bring attention to your tweets for the right reasons and to attract the people looking for the books you have published

Using hashtags on TwitterThere will of course be very broad and generic hashtags, as there is for any search term (keyword). But be aware the broader the term the more results there will be and the higher the level of competition against you. So it is often a good idea to be more specific. Using book categories is one step in the right direction but there are other ways as well.

For example if you are writing a book for expats or about expat life, then rather than use the #book option you could use something like #expat or #expatlife. Both these are terms that are predicted by twitter when you are writing a status as shown in the image.

To find the predicted hashtags it is easier to actually be posting in Twitter rather than tweeting from a 3rd party social media share program, this is because the predictive hashtags are rarely available through 3rd party software.

You will also see from the image that there are a combination of capital and lowercase letters, but hashtags are not case sensitive so it doesn’t really matter whether you use capitals or not. It is important however to make sure you use the hashtag at the front of your chosen term and with no spaces in between the words.

For some general guidance on how to use hashtags on Twitter you can review Twitters own advice https://support.twitter.com/articles/49309-using-hashtags-on-twitter

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You will probably find that most Twitter hashtags on book related topics already exist, the list above is anything but exhaustive, it is there only to give you a bit of a head start on what hashtags are available. Using the predictive method described earlier is where you will be able to home in on the specific hashtags available that will describe your particular book. Remembering that it doesn’t necessarily need to be book related, sometimes a location,  an industry or any other relevant topic the book covers may work better for you. Just experiment to see what gives you the most exposure and, even better, sales.

Also don’t fall into the trap of simply stuffing lots of hashtags into a single tweet, you only have 140 characters so use them wisely to grab the attention of your audience and always remember you are writing for humans not search engines.

It is also worth noting that the #standard has now been adopted by other social media sites, Facebook, Google+ and several other major players have jumped onto this particular bandwagon. So don’t be shy about using your chosen hashtag term across all your social media sites that utilise them.

So all that there is left to say now is:

Twitter with HashtagsTwitter with HashtagsHAPPY TWEETING