A Book Marketing Guide – Are You Using Hashtags on Twitter?

November 12, 2014 in Articles, Book Marketing, Book promotions

Twitter & HashtagsI am pretty sure that most people involved in any online marketing, whether that is for books or any other product, will have heard of or even use Twitter. But many will perhaps not be so familiar with the practice of using hashtags on Twitter to ensure their tweets can be found by the people interested in the topic they are tweeting about.

To sum it up, putting a hashtag (#) before a word in a twitter status is a way of identifying the topic being tweeted about. What this means is that when another user searches on Twitter for that subject, they are likely to use the ‘hashtag‘ search term to really home in on the topics of interest.

Just for clarity I should point out that using the # (hashtag) is not an official Twitter function, it was started, allegedly, by a Twitter user who thought that it was a good idea to add some sort of identifier to a keyword (a term people search for) to make it easier to find. And it just took off. So now anyone can create a hashtag and they can try and make it into a Twitter standard. For example if I added #ebookissues to every tweet I posted, people would be able to use that hashtag term to identify any discussions about this website or the tweets posted about this website. The aim of course is make the term go viral and to see it trending on Twitter, in other words to have thousands of people talking about and discussing the topic.

Why would you want to be using hashtags on Twitter As a Writer?

Why is this useful for writers and authors that use Twitter? The answer is twofold:

  • Firstly you can create a hashtag for you as an author, or your book title or your book series. Effectively creating a brand and a way for your readers to find your book related tweets easily. There is work involved in this option and you will need to persevere, but it is certainly possible
  • Secondly you can use established hashtag terms to bring attention to your tweets for the right reasons and to attract the people looking for the books you have published

Using hashtags on TwitterThere will of course be very broad and generic hashtags, as there is for any search term (keyword). But be aware the broader the term the more results there will be and the higher the level of competition against you. So it is often a good idea to be more specific. Using book categories is one step in the right direction but there are other ways as well.

For example if you are writing a book for expats or about expat life, then rather than use the #book option you could use something like #expat or #expatlife. Both these are terms that are predicted by twitter when you are writing a status as shown in the image.

To find the predicted hashtags it is easier to actually be posting in Twitter rather than tweeting from a 3rd party social media share program, this is because the predictive hashtags are rarely available through 3rd party software.

You will also see from the image that there are a combination of capital and lowercase letters, but hashtags are not case sensitive so it doesn’t really matter whether you use capitals or not. It is important however to make sure you use the hashtag at the front of your chosen term and with no spaces in between the words.

For some general guidance on how to use hashtags on Twitter you can review Twitters own advice https://support.twitter.com/articles/49309-using-hashtags-on-twitter

Pinterest-Pin-Image

You will probably find that most Twitter hashtags on book related topics already exist, the list above is anything but exhaustive, it is there only to give you a bit of a head start on what hashtags are available. Using the predictive method described earlier is where you will be able to home in on the specific hashtags available that will describe your particular book. Remembering that it doesn’t necessarily need to be book related, sometimes a location,  an industry or any other relevant topic the book covers may work better for you. Just experiment to see what gives you the most exposure and, even better, sales.

Also don’t fall into the trap of simply stuffing lots of hashtags into a single tweet, you only have 140 characters so use them wisely to grab the attention of your audience and always remember you are writing for humans not search engines.

It is also worth noting that the #standard has now been adopted by other social media sites, Facebook, Google+ and several other major players have jumped onto this particular bandwagon. So don’t be shy about using your chosen hashtag term across all your social media sites that utilise them.

So all that there is left to say now is:

Twitter with HashtagsTwitter with HashtagsHAPPY TWEETING

The First Rule of Marketing – Never Give Up

October 2, 2014 in Articles, Book Marketing, Book promotions

virtual book shelvesHow many authors put true blood, sweat and tears into writing their books. Hours of research, editing and re-editing, proofreading and formatting. Finally their book is ready to publish and then it is all systems go.

Friends and family are enlisted to help promote the book, reviews are sought and provided (hopefully of the verified purchaser variety) and some initial sales are made. Then the ideas run out, the social media buzz goes quiet and what looked like a promising start seems to wither on the vine……sales stop altogether. Months go by and there isn’t a single sale.

So what do you do now, Give Up?

For a hard copy book sitting on the  shelves of book stores, this would have been the death knell, the books would be removed from the shelves to make room for more popular varieties, books that are actually selling. Even publishers and bookstores need to make a living and a book that is not selling does not turn a profit – they have to go.

Traditional publishing is where books, printed in large quantities at equally large cost, must either sell or become door stops. Also if the demand for these books has waned, a commercial decision has to made about whether a further print run is likely to result in a profit or it is simply time to take them out of print.

But that is not the case for ebooks or print on demand, there is no physical stock to carry or to take prime spot on a bookshelf. These books sit on a virtual bookshelf that is of unlimited size and are always, as they say analogically…..in print.

Authors and publishers of ebooks and print on demand books have a huge advantage over traditional publishing for this reason and that is why you must never give up promoting books that are still available in digital format or can be printed on a one off basis at reasonable cost.

It has to be said, the best chance you have of taking a book to best seller status, with Amazon in particular,  is in it’s early days after initial publication, getting a second or third wind underway is always more difficult. But not impossible.

Marketing ebooks successfully is about having a marketing plan, one that takes into account the initial launch and then, equally importantly, ongoing and long term promotion.

Initial Considerations for Marketing eBooks Successfully

eBooks are like any other products that need to be sold, they have to appeal to a specific market and be visible to that market. So how do you do that exactly?

First of all, whether you are writing a reference or a fictional book, you need to think about exactly who will want to read your book. In many ways that is easier to do for reference books, because you are writing about a topic of specific interest and if you do it well, so that you answer questions and solve problems, then there is a good chance with enough visibility that people will buy those books, especially in a highly sought after topic.

Fiction is a little more difficult because they are made up stories, but they still need to be approached in the same way. For example, if you are writing for children, young adults, lovers of horror or action adventure. The book should be written to appeal to those audiences and not alienate them in any way. For example you cannot write a children’s book and then include some explicit sexual content, a bit of an extreme example admittedly but used to make the point. Mistakes of this type will mean you cannot market to your intended audience. So when you are writing a book, stay true to the theme, if it is intended for young adults or is in a specific genre try and make sure it meets that objective for the entire book.

Identifying Search Keywords

The second aspect of book marketing is about visibility, or being found by your target audience. Here there is a need to consider a little bit of search engine science i.e. it is necessary to think about how people search for books on the Internet, even on sites like Amazon or Kobo.

One of the simplest ways to find a book is to search using specific words. In search engine world, these are called keywords (or sometimes tags). It is always a good idea to identify keywords that people use to search for books that are relevant to your book. One way to do that is to make a list of keywords that you think are relevant to your book and then go to an Amazon site and start to type those words into the search box. Below there is an example of how Amazon use predictive text, based on previous searches, to try and lead you to the product you are searching for.

Marketing Ebooks

You don’t know how many people type the specific search terms listed, but you do know they are real searches that have been entered previously. So if you can find the best ones i.e. the ones highly relevant to your book, you can list them ready for potential use confident in the knowledge that people are using those terms to look for products. I say products because the searches relates to all of Amazon not just books, so just be sure you are selecting book related terms.

The second part of this exercise is to find out how much competition you are up against. So when you have your list of keyword phrases you should go back to Amazon and find out how many search results the keywords return.

Successful book promotion You can see from the result for the search term ‘The Whistleblower Affair’ that there are 49 results for that term.

Why is that important?

It is important because that is the number of books you are competing against for that specific search term or keyword phrase. What you should be trying to do is to find a mix of low to medium competition, especially for a new book. In other words you want to be more visible in the search results and a way to ensure that is not to be competing against too many other books.

Clearly as you make more sales, get more reviews and achieve more success for your book, your sales rank will increase and then you can consider going up against more competition. But until then it is better to operate in the low to medium competition arena.

A further aspect of this exercise is ensuring that your book is associated with a search term or keyword phrase. There are a couple of ways for doing that. The first is to use an allocated ‘search keyword’. Amazon allow you to add seven search keywords to your book details when you add it to the bookshelf. When you do this you will always be returned for that search keyword in the search results, although the critical aspect… is in what position?

This, as previously alluded to, will depend on the competition you are up against. Both in terms of how many but also in terms of sales rank. Amazon like to push books that are selling to the forefront, for obvious reasons the better sales rank books will be returned first. So the fewer books you are competing against the more likely it is you will be listed in a more visible search position.

The second way to get your book associated with a search term is to use those search terms in titles, headings and descriptions. There is no guarantee with this method, but it is a way to get your book listed beyond the seven allocated ‘search keywords’. Don’t be tempted just to stuff keywords into your descriptions and titles however, because you still want to appeal to a human audience and not alienate the people who actually buy the books. Just use this technique if it can be done naturally and, even better, provide you with an attention grabbing title or description.

Choosing Categories

Amazon allows independent publishers to select 2 categories from their large list of available categories. This is another key area for gaining much needed visibility. The best way of gaining a good position in a category is by being specific rather than adopting general categories. As with ‘search keywords’ you need to consider what is relevant to your book and how much competition you are up against. The reasons are once again to try and ensure you get that critical level of visibility where enough people actually see your book and are hopefully drawn into making a purchase.

romance competition Take ‘Romance’ as a category for example, you can see here that there are 170,462 books in the romance category. That is a lot of competition and unless your book is a top best seller it is unlikely that it will ever be given the light of day if this category is chosen.

romance-military-competition Military romance on the other hand immediately brings the competition level down to a more reasonable 3,186 books in competition. Still a big number but at least a half chance, if you get some sales, of being visible and there are other categories with even less competition. But remember you book does need to fit under the category chosen, so go for at least one category that is relevant with the least amount of competition and select another that is possibly even more relevant but has more competition. That way you get a good mix for advancing the number of potential sales and for ensuring you gain at least some visibility.

Also don’t constrain yourself to fiction only, if your book is relevant to a non-fiction topic and that looks like a better opportunity, give it a try. If it doesn’t produce any sales you can always change it after a reasonable trial period.

Why this is important, for Amazon anyway, is that you may be able to achieve  the much coveted top 100 listing, that gives your book higher standing and extra visibility through being included in list promotions for Amazon’s best sellers.amazon-best-sellers

If your sales are flagging or have dried up completely it is not too late to go back to basics and if you haven’t performed these exercises then why not do it now? You may just stumble on some way of sparking sales, even if it means a new title, description or choice of search keywords and categories. It really is never too late to get these basics right.

More information on successful book marketing can be found in these articles:

 

photo credit: Zenobia Gonsalves via photopin cc

Goodreads – A Good Choice for Authors

August 5, 2014 in Articles, Book Marketing, Book promotions

social media for booksIt has to be said there are social media sites and there are social media sites for independent publishers, authors and writers. Goodreads fits into the latter category. Why? Because that is where book lovers hang out, writers and readers.

Now if you are a writer then there is one thing you will be desperate for and, yes, that is readers.

Goodreads then should definitely be on your list of social media sites, because in reality that is the biggest social media site for book readers. Yes of course you will also find them on Facebook, Google+, Twitter etc. But they could be on those sites for any number of reasons. For example they may be there to stay in touch with family or be keeping up to speed with friends old and new or they may simply be promoting their business or looking for services.

But one thing you know for sure, if they are on Goodreads, is that they have either written or published a book and are promoting it, or they are there looking for the next good book to read. They are not going to be there discussing the great family party the night before, or asking you to play Candy Crush. No, there is only one reason people register on Goodreads and that is books.

Don’t get me wrong, you can find groups on all the social media sites that talk about and are interested in books and of course you can try and interact with those groups to see if you can find readers. In fact when you have time you should probably do that.

But on Goodreads you know you have an audience that is genuinely interested in books, a captive audience for all intents and purposes. Plus you have all the Goodreads tools at your disposal, you can for example:

  • add your books with all the relevant information
  • share the status of the book
  • recommend it to groups of friends or followers
  • create custom shelves for specific genres
  • create posts for your own blog
  • start discussions about a book
  • create quizzes for a bit of visitor interaction
  • share your book news using the various widgets that are available to embed it in your own blog or website

All this is completely free of charge. Plus of course you can be talking about, recommending and categorizing the books you like or have published and adding them to Listmania lists so readers can find them, not to mention the review feature of Goodreads which is the most basic function of the site.

Goodreads Social Media for Books

Authors can even sell their books on Goodreads or upload an epub or pdf file to allow Goodreads members to read the whole book or an excerpt from the book. This functionality is found via the author page, which you can only have if you have written and published a book.

Of course you have to remember that the site is primarily intended for book lovers to share and recommend their book experiences and no-one wants to be bored to death by a writer with only one obvious and sole intention – to sell their book.  I am afraid that even on a social site for books you will have to behave appropriately, perhaps even share your opinion about someone else’s book ~ heaven forbid ~ so that people can see you actually have an interest in books beyond your own or just trying to sell them.

I am sure I have probably forgotten some of the services that Goodreads offers to both writers and readers, but you should be getting my gist. If you have a genuine interest in books and want to find other people that share that interest, then Goodreads is a great place to do it. Plus if you approach it in that way i.e. show you have a real interest in books, then you will soon find that people warm to you and, after a while, they might even buy some of your books.

So if you are a writer or publisher and you have books you would like to promote – what are you waiting for. Goodreads is one of the best marketing tools you have available.

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photo credit: boltron- via photopin cc

Read an eBook Week is Here on Smashwords

March 3, 2014 in Articles, Book promotions

eBook SaleRead an eBook week has arrived on Smashwords and runs from the 2nd March 2014 to the 8th March 2014, so you need to get cracking if you would like to find yourself FREE or heavily discounted eBooks from your favorite authors.

All listed authors from Moulin Publications are participating in the sale with books on offer ranging from Free to up to 75% discount.

For the discounted books all you need to do is look for the discount code (depending on the level of discount available, it will look a little like this – RW75 ) and enter it where requested when you checkout the book. It couldn’t be simpler to take advantage of these great discount or FREE deals.

eBook SaleYou will find a full range of stories and novels, action-adventure, mystery, suspense and romance  or you can pick up some great reference books. For example this Web Marketing & SEO Guide is available all week with a massive 75% discount or you can get this Growing & Caring for Tomatoes book for FREE.

Tell Your Story With An Infographic

January 18, 2014 in Articles, Book Marketing, Book promotions, Writing & Publishing

Book Writing Infographic

 

The world is changing and people are being overwhelmed by information.Communication is instant, huge numbers of people use smart-phones or mobile devices and life is fast moving and hectic. So it becomes pretty clear that pages full of text and little else are probably not ever going to be read, unless they come in the form of a book of course.

But you, as an author or publisher, still need to gain the attention of a public audience.

Enter the infographic, a new way to communicate. 

Infographics convey their message through a mixture of symbols, icons, graphical images and text. They give the creator a chance to be creative and the more creative you are the more attractive your infographic will be.

I used http://magic.piktochart.com/ to create the infographic above, I signed in with my Google+ account, but it could have been Facebook or I could have created a username and password. The point being that I was registered in literally seconds and was then able to view a few very short tutorial videos. Within 5 to 10 minutes I was then designing my very first infographic on Piktochart.

How to Write A BookI will be the first to admit that the resulting infographic is not the most creative you will ever encounter, but I can genuinely say that from a standing start, of never having used the program before, 2 hours later I was able to publish the infographic that describes How to Write a Book or Novel: An Insider’s Guide to Getting PublishedHow to Write a Book or NovelWriting a book.

Why is that important? Basically because it provides another medium with which I can describe what the book is about and share it through social media sites that are very much geared towards presenting graphical information in the form of an image.

Google loves text, the search engine relies on it to decipher what a page is all about, but social media sites like graphics and they make it very easy to share a graphic. So if the infographic is good and conveys its message in a clear concise way, there is no real reason why it couldn’t suddenly go viral around the Internet bringing lots of traffic to the associated link in the process.

Social Media Sites for Graphics

Remembering that you can upload and post to many, many sites. The principal ones being Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, Instagram, Scoop and many more. The latter ones becoming very popular because they are pretty much ‘graphic’ based. One of my personal favourites is Pinterest and I have already seen some image based pages being re-pinned more than a 1000 times and of course every pin carries the link you provided.

There are of course many sites that provide a resource that allows you to design an instagraphic, many free and many paid. The benefit of paying for the service generally means you don’t have to carry the resource link for the site, which for many will be worth the money. But for me I am not particularly concerned so I went with the free version.

More Infographic Resource Sites

I haven’t used any of the ones above so can’t vouch for how easy or hard they are to use, but I definitely found Piktochart easy to use and I would imagine that any of these others would be equally easy.

So Good Luck With Your Infographics and please rate this post if you like what you read

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