Three Ways To Lose Money Writing And Publishing A Book

December 14, 2014 in Articles, eBook publishing

Writing and publishing a book

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Writing a Book

Shocking fact: for those thinking of  writing and publishing a book, it’s never been easier, or cheaper. Word-processors have removed the tedium, printers have moved from molten lead to instant computerised copy, and even publishers (now ruled by accountants) can be by-passed, thanks to the Internet. All you have to do is write the book.

And more shocks: you can do it. Don’t believe those who say it requires years of effort, a degree in English Literature, and hours of bought-in expertise from professionals. A commercial novel of 80,000 words may strike you as daunting before you’ve even written the title down, but at the rate of a thousand words a day – little more than snail’s pace even for a two-finger typist – you are ‘round the world in eighty days’. And take it from me, once you are well into your book, on a good day, you will find the words flowing like there’s no tomorrow as your muse becomes excited by your progress.

Publishing a Book, The Pitfalls and Ways to Lose Money

Now for the bad news. What I’ve summarised above has been written with my optimist’s hat on – a well-worn item that will outlive me, I hope. I don’t have a pessimist’s hat, but through my work offering book editing and publishing advice, I am appalled at the number of individuals and companies who regard the aspiring writer as juicy game to be corralled, groomed, flattered, . . . and then mercilessly bled dry of every penny they own. We writers are often romantics who think the best of people. And when praise is lavished on our work – work that we ourselves are too involved with to be objective about – we tend to weep with relief. And pay, and pay, and pay.

An example: it happened quite a while ago now. A client of mine won first prize in a popular competition for new authors’ work. I’d edited the book. Very little to do; the guy could write. The book is now in print, self-published, and successful (paying its way). Always keen to boast about success indirectly, much subtler than trumpet blowing for oneself, I contacted a London book editing service who claim to help aspiring writers and introduce likely candidates to literary agents and publishers. The owner thanked me profusely for thinking of them. I introduced my author. Four days later they emailed my client offering a range of services, the cheapest of which was more than enough for him to print another 250 copies of his book.

A professional book editor, literary agent or publisher can spot in minutes whether a writer’s work has promise. Within an hour they can spot major failings or indications of commercial appeal.

Trap One. Don’t be fooled by organisations who seek hundreds of pounds from you to evaluate your work. Such evaluations are invariably bloated exercises designed to baffle and bemuse, and relieve you of money. If you need this much help you would be better advised to invest in a writing school course. Good ones can teach you a lot, at competitive rates . . . and advance your writing prospects. Asking a book editor to teach you to write is folly, and expensive.

Trap Two. Beware of any literary agent who either charges you directly or suggests that have your work edited by any specific agency. Reputable literary agents don’t charge, even to read your work.

Trap Three. Avoid all dealings with companies who promote their services offering to help you get published. The majority are bandits; the few who offer a genuine service are branded by the majority and your book will be shunned by the trade. Self-publishing is a prudent course for some writers, but remember, if traditional publishers don’t regard your work as commercially viable they are telling you something: if they can’t work out how to make it pay by attracting enough buyers, you’re highly unlikely to do better alone. Having said that, with the right professional advice, it is possible to order a limited number of copies of your book, at a modest cost, if you are introduced to the right people. You will retain all rights to your work, and reap the net income on all sales.

My advice: contact a few book editing services and ask them how much they charge to help new writers. Professional ones, with ethical standards, will ask for samples of your writing and in many cases undertake some preliminary work at their own expense. If they like what they see, they will then quote, by the hour or page to edit your draft.  General advice and expertise on publishing should not be expensive, if charged for at all.

Book Publishing Resources

This is a guest article from Jonathan Veale writer and author of How to Write a Book or Novel – An Insider’s Guide to Getting Published

If you enjoyed this article you are sure to enjoy the detailed information that Jonathan shares in his book which you can purchase using the link above.

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